Posts Tagged ‘Jason E. Sandberg’

Virginia Bound…

July 29, 2016

First, some quick updates on this past spring: We have been working with industrial furniture. Rescued an old Science class table and gave it some Sandberg Creative love. It now lives in Dallas, TX. Spent the early spring selling old school lockers and keeping a few for my own studio. Spare time has include finishing up on some random art pieces. (Industrial-Joman Teapot) (Small problems #1)

Early June, I took a planned research trip to Virginia. It was an overdue trip as my list of subjects and places in Virginia had grown to excess by the time I set out. After a couple of days and several hundred miles in my travels, I met up with a friend from college, Manda Remmen and we went on a mission to check out some of the sites photographed by O. Winston Link. (our most alluring part of the mission was trying to identify the bell tower from Link’s sounRural Retreatd piece “Rural Retreat.” We found a good candidate but will have to dig deeper.  I took many reference photos along the way as I was also researching architecture along the Pre-1964 Norfolk and Western Railway mainline. After a quick tour to the start of the Bristol “Virginia Creeper” line and miles of trekking along  highway 81, we finally found where Elvis had stopped to pee. We toured around Emory and Henry college, where my friend teaches art. They actually still have been using the original N&W depot for various administrative departments. After some local fare, we settled down to discuss the days findings. In the morning, I took off on a rambling trip toward Roanoke. At Roanoke, I checked out the Virginia Museum of Transportation. This museum, with VERY DEDICATED staff and volunteers accomplished the highly complicated (and expensive task) of restoring a steam engine to operate pretty much as it was built through their fireup611 campaign. I have to admit that I am a bit nostalgic about the locomotive Class “J” 611 as I have childhood memories attached to this engineering marvel. The VMT was one of my most anticipated stops on the trip but I was somewhat let down. Overall, I liked it and am very glad that I went. On the other hand, I felt like many of the exhibits were very aged. I believe that at one point I found a “click tape” label on one of the older displays. If they do another capital campaign, I would love to direct the exhibits department to help create a modern, interactive group of exhibits for all ages. I understand how funding streams work, and wish that they could uncover other streams to help bring other areas of the museum up to the quality of their steam program. For instance, the children’s area which was located at the far end of the railroad platform in dirty sand by an old storage shed. No one would even be able to see their children if they were brave enough to let them stay there. I would have felt more comfortable allowing my kids to play on splintered, rusted railroad detritus than the out dated playground equipment that was present.

After a long day at VMT, I was pushing time but decided to squeeze my visit to the O. Winston Link museum back in to my itinerary. After entering the former Norfolk & Western Depot and paying my entry fee, I walked down the glass walled staircase to the museum on the lower level. upon entry, I was welcomed by a floor-to-ceiling 20-foot black and white wall print of one of Link’s prints wallpapered down the hall. How glorious! This museum was done right! multiple prints, physical exhibits, sound pieces and collections. It was refreshing to see a museum that I felt like I new the artist by the end. I was traveling with him emotionally on a 6 year journey of time tables, late nights and friends that trusted in him the passion that he was trying to document.  After visiting, I do feel that it may have been skewed toward adults, and a bit safe as museums go. I would have loved to see a digital room with props that kids and adults could attempt to light and photograph. Overall, it was well done and very much worth the last minute addition to my time in Roanoke.

After a bit of BBQ, I began my journey up highway 80 toward Front Royal, VA just outside of D.C. The morning held a unique experience that would flood back childhood memories. Months prior to my trip, I had purchased tickets to ride the Norfolk and Western Class J #611. As a child, the Norfolk & Western/ Norfolk Southern would use this rescued locomotive to carry the brass on summer trips around the Eastern half of the U.S. As a child, when we heard the 611 was coming through, we would head several blocks across town to my Grandparent’s house by the Decatur to STL mainline. We would wait for hours until we could hear the distinct bellow from the “Queen of Steam” and listen to it build until it broke out of town and barreled south across the prairie. These feelings boiled back up into me as I waited at 6:00am for the newly restored 611 to pull into Front Royal.FullSizeRender

Nursing a hangover from a convenient club across from the depot, I sucked it up and searched for a location to get a decent video. I began to hear the distinct low notes of the J’s whistle as it was rounding through town toward the station.  It would be a fine time to note that a high-pressured “Modern” steam locomotive that was built to operate 20 car trains at 80mph, has very little in common with our childhood sense of a “choo choo.” As a J approaches you, the breathing of such a beast becomes alive to you. the “chuffs” of it’s enormous cylinders feel like small explosions. The soot and steam inundate you as it slowly powers by you and a blast of the whistle is enough to cancel out the speaker in your cell phone. As the cacophony of pounding, hissing, vibrating, and squealing passed behind the parking garage I hustled down to my car, the Ohio, and boarded. In a few minutes we began moving. It was anti-climatic as riding behind a Class J was just as smooth and quiet as a modern Amtrak. I would forget that I was riding behind a 75 year old piece of American forged machinery that could shake the fillings out of your teeth if it were not for the occasional glimpse of the locomotive out of the window when gliding around the Appalachian curves.

Next month, I will be talking about another kind of steam: the STEAM kind. so put on your teacher/Learner hats and check back for the new programs that we are currently developing at Sandbergcreative that may be coming to a Learning Center near you!

 

Peace, Art, & Education

New Show

March 1, 2016

Hello, friends! Last weekend found me taking a relaxing though scheduled drive to the Saint Louis Metro area to deliver new artwork. The pieces are a diptych of two 24″ X 36″ “airscapes” done in acrylic on wood. Yes, I do make two-dimensional artwork! I often find that some of my sculptures are too large for some venues and over the last couple of years I have begun finishing some of my sculptural ideas so that they can be displayed as well. The title of the diptych is Air to Air Porn Remix. I sometimes spend too much time on titles but this one is different as the title reflects the history of the piece. In Graduate School at the University of Wisconsin- Madison, it was a house cleaning every year that a graduating class moved out leaving friends with loads of artwork of varying degrees of finish for their friends. One of my good friends, Justin Maes awarded me with some large wood A-A Porn Close-upcanvasses depicting military individuals in compromising positions. They were very beautiful to look at but the content makes them quite hard to display. Justin was always remixing artwork and music, producing his own tracks in Grad School to accompany some of his works. two years ago, with little money to buy food, let alone canvas, I chose to do my own remix. For two pieces, I chose to paint over the figures with various shades of blue depicting the upper atmosphere. I then placed paper planes engaged in a dogfight, launching phallic salt and pepper shakers at each other. I feel that the content of the original piece still comes through but in a very different way. Over time, I will probably do at least one more set of paintings based on Justin’s paint-outs. More paper airplanes could be involved. Not sure, but they keep coming back repeatedly in my work as I dig deeper into the connections between, violence, beauty, war fighting, heroism, toys, and patriotism. So, if you are in the STL area, check out the show at Saint Charles Community College! March 7th – April 8th.

Talk soon,

Sandy

Making Stuff…again

November 24, 2015

It is far too easy to get focused on “things” in life and forget to stand back and document what has been going on. I promise (maybe in a pre-resolution) that I will start updating regularly now that my new website is running. First, a quick catch up on what has been going on:

After moving around the U.S. for a bit, I used my available time for some “friend” work that needed catching up. At the top of the list was my friend Eric’s basement of his new house. The canvas was a 1300 sq.ft. basement with 10′ ceilings that he wanted to look like an East Coast “speak easy.” I began with faux painting 52oo bricks (on concrete cast walls) to look like 100 year old wood fired bricks. While I designed a late colonial bar, back bar, and paneling from quarter sawn oak, he used acid to finish the concrete floors in a copper-ish tone. Since then, it has been a work in progress. I hand painted a Victorian era advertisement for his pub (Station #7) on one of the brick end walls. We had discussed a theatre add for the opposing wall where his projector was set up. Meanwhile my friend, Eric, married a designer. With her collaboration, we narrowed in the focus with a very industrial spin on Colonial design. For the entertainment end of the space, we decided on a vintage cinema sign complete with incandescent glove lights with motorized optics. As the wiring is finally getting finished, we are discussing finishing the back bar with a salt water aquarium and a copper bar top. The space has been finished with vintage signs and Edison bulbs. The bar seats 15 patrons, and has full amenities including a popcorn popper.

While doing the Station 7 project, I had a piece in the Ossuary show by Laurie Beth Clark at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, as well as the Herron Gallery in Indianapolis. It was a silver necklace displaying five silver bullets that had the firing primers replaced with black onyx. It was part of my ongoing research of populations using war detritus as objects of function and beauty. I would suggest reading The Sex Lives of Cannibals by Maartin Troost. Not just for the small references of Pacific Islands using left over combat materials as playgrounds for children, but because it is disturbingly funny.

#HIDJS_ArtOfCan

On a threat from my Wife, (girlfriend at the time) I decided to enter the Red Bull sculpture contest in 2014. I had been working on a piece and after committing, I did a run for 60 hours straight to finish the piece. With no time left to ship, I caught three hours sleep and took the train to Chicago for the initial judging. When asked about return shipping, I told them that they could discard the piece after the judging. Two days later, I received an email telling me that it was accepted to the final show Art of Can. Wow, OK! So I booked two more tickets on Amtrak and we shot up to Millennium Park for the show where Red Bull Corp. had set up a glass gallery in the middle of the park. It was a great reception with many perks and swag. I found it a bit crazy that I was slaving away at a “real” job during the day, sculpting at night, then less than a month later, we were partying it up on a Chicago rooftop until 4:00am. By the way, I got zero votes as Red Bull mislabeled my Twitter vote from #HEDJS to #HIDJS. Instead of letting people vote for my piece it directed them to a Twitter sight for a group called “HI DJ’s.” Oh, well, still a great time!

Next post, I will put up images for the creative types as I know that all of these words can sometimes be a bore. Be sure to check out sandysandbergcreative.com or sandbergcreativeservices.com  contact me if you are interested in industrial looking exhibit work.

Peace!

The Countdown…

April 13, 2011

Hello, all!

Wisconsin politics are in the courts now and I have been working on the sculptural installation for my M.A. Show. It will be on April 30, in front of the Art Lofts on 111 N. Frances St. in Madison, WI. I was just getting ready to change venues and order cards, when I finally got approval to shut down the street that night. My cards are coming this week. At least it will be fresh in everyone’s memory. I worked with my fellow artists, Dale Kaminski, and Andrew Sawler on my imagery. I wanted to get the context just right. We chose an image of a 9=year old on a flight line near some jet fuel tanks. Some details were ‘shopped out and others enhanced. We paid close attention to the position of his eyes, and the position of the text. I will just post it. Feel free to critique my postcard. Even Better, come critique my show! It begins at 8:00 pm.

The Myth of Patriotism

I had bounced between a couple of wordier title versions but it began to sound like a doctoral thesis. Leaving “The Myth of Patriotism” is short, effective, and sacrilegious. I want to open more dialogue about patriotism and nationalism. I believe that both are tools for manipulation and power. I often recall the thought that one group’s terrorists, are another group’s freedom fighters. Only with a true discussion can we strip away  layers of the programming that family, friends, community, government and culture as a whole have been applying from the time we were all children. Many of my friends in the military, as well as many family members, would not agree with this but I enjoy a friendly discussion! Logically, nationalism/patriotism does not work out as a productive “ism” in culture. I will leave that alone for now as it is time to go teach then get back in the studio and finish up the mounting system for my feature piece of the up-coming installation.  Peace!